The Art of the Gag

It’s Buster’s birthday, and this was on the front page of Reddit tonight. I’ve never been so quick to subscribe to a YouTube channel after watching a video (well, except maybe this time). I love the choice of clips mixed with the audio interviews with Buster (he’s from Kansas, can you tell?). I’m a huge believer that physicalContinue reading “The Art of the Gag”

The General: Fury Road

First of all, I’m super late to the game, but Mad Max: Fury Road = BIG OL’ THUMBS UP. Fiery dystopian car chases and an inexplicable flamethrowing guitar? I can’t believe it took me this long to see it. Actually, the perceived violence/intensity of Mad Max is what kept me from watching it in theaters, because I’m a huge scaredyContinue reading “The General: Fury Road”

How to be a detective

Sherlock Jr. was the first Buster Keaton film I ever saw (shoutout to Professor Kuntz’s History of American Motion Picture class, 2008!), but it was grossly overshadowed by The Kid, which we watched in the same session. I became a hopeless Chaplin fanatic after that, and it took a while for me to get as obsessedContinue reading “How to be a detective”

Happy Festivus! (one day late)

I was planning to post this on actual Festivus, but I got distracted in the best way possible (getting together with old friends and playing Super Smash Bros.). In any case, it’s less of a holiday post and more of an end-of-the-year-lollapalooza sort of thing. I started out with just the odds & ends but somehow thisContinue reading “Happy Festivus! (one day late)”

autobiography reviews

…Just what you wanted to see, I’m sure. Haha. I’ve definitely gotten back into reading for fun lately (by “lately” I mean the last year or so, and by “fun” I mean instead of schoolwork), but when I look at the books I’ve read since then I realize they were almost all autobiographies. What canContinue reading “autobiography reviews”

Hollywood in the 1910s and 20s

Excerpts from Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton’s autobiographies: Thomas Ince gave barbeques and dances at his studio, which was in the wilds of northern Santa Monica, facing the Pacific Ocean. What wondrous nights – youth and beauty dancing to plaintive music on an open-air stage, with the soft sound of waves pounding on the nearbyContinue reading “Hollywood in the 1910s and 20s”